Sowing the Seeds of Sustainability

Monday 3 April 2017

 


Haleema Bibi planting seeds in her kitchen garden in Khipro village, district Sanghar, Sindh.

Haleema Bibi and her husband Suleman Kumbhar live in the small village of Khipro, situated in Sanghar District of the Sindh province. They migrated to Khipro 40 years ago from Kohat. Haleema and Suleman have 10 children together.

Suleman was a pottery maker by profession and Haleema helped him by painting the pottery. Their income was not enough to fulfil the basic needs of the family.


Haleema’s husband is a pottery maker by profession and she assisted him by painting the pottery.

During last two years, Save the Children has provided seeds and Kitchen Gardening inputs to 5,309 females in 120 villages of Sanghar District, Sindh as part of its BMZ-funded project titled “Increased Food Security and Resilience of Vulnerable Communities in Sanghar, Sindh.” The Project aims to enhance food security and resilience of 120 vulnerable communities in Sanghar District of the Sindh province. This will develop the capacity of communities to cope with natural disasters and enable farmers and food-insecure families to establish sustainable, resilient livelihoods.


Haleema has now extended her vegetable garden to three plots. She cooks healthy meals for her children with the produce and sells the excess to earn money.

Luckily, in 2015, Haleema also received kitchen garden seeds from Save the Children for the first time. Overtime, she managed to grow a successful plantation during the first year. Haleema and Suleman have now diversified their plantation to three plots- two full of vegetables and one partly done. The Project team was also pleasantly surprised to discover that Haleema and Suleman are also generating income by selling excess vegetables from the gardens in their neighbourhood and nearby villages.


Haleema’s husband helps her wife in maintaining the kitchen garden and is very happy that their children get to have healthy, nutritious food now.

They water their plots with hand pumps due to which their neighbours also get free and clean water all day long while the excess water is directed back into the plots. What started out as a simple attempt to grow a kitchen garden has now turned into a healthy, sustainable lifestyle that not only benefits Haleema and Suleman, but also those around them.

We eat three meals a day now and only buy oil from the market. We make a good earning and no one in the family sleeps hungry. We hope to expand our vegetable gardens to five plots,” Suleman adds with a smile.


Haleema and her husband use a hand pump to water their plots. Their neighbours also get free and clean water all day long from the pump while the excess water is directed back into the plots.